This week, Alex, Jerry, Daniel, and Flo talk about the Google event happening on October 4, and how Google’s Pixel phones need something truly special to make a mark on the industry in ways the Nexuses never could. Speaking of which, what exactly is that Andromeda thing that leaked?

And BlackBerry is no longer making its own phones. Is that a big deal when the company pledged years ago to be a software company first?

Finally, Android Wear 2.0 has been delayed. Boo! But its scope is much bigger than when it first debuted earlier this year, so when smartwatches finally are released with it, we’ll actually have some pretty cool new stuff to look forward to.

Thanks to this week’s sponsor:

  • Harrys: Use promo code AC to save $5 off your first purchase — start shaving smarter.
Podcast MP3 URL: 
http://traffic.libsyn.com/androidcentral/androidcentral308.mp3




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |

With less than a week to go before the unveiling of the Pixel and Pixel XL, we now have the exact measurements of the Pixel XL. The phone will measure 154.72mm x 75.74mm x 8.5mm with the bottom of the … Read More

The post Pixel XL dimension and new photos revealed in new leak appeared first on HTC Source.




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: HTC |

Are the Samsung IconX worth your money?

Bluetooth earbuds have a single job: to deliver audio wirelessly from somewhere else. We muse about the quality of that audio and the battery life of the various products delivering that audio to help determine which is “best” for everyone. Sometimes we find models with nice things like touch controls or the ability to connect with Google Now, but the core feature of your average Bluetooth headset is to deliver audio wirelessly.

Samsung upended that idea with the Gear IconX earbuds, because looking at these as simply Bluetooth earbuds kind of misses the point. They work as fitness trackers, a MP3 players, audio filters, and while delivering audio wirelessly from somewhere else. Packing all of that into something that all but disappears into your ear is no small task, and like all first generation products some sacrifices are made along the way.

An absurd but useful set up process

The small pill-shaped container that slides out of the IconX box is everything you need to get started. The microUSB port on the back of the case and three small LED lights — one for each earbud and one for the case itself — tell you everything you need to know about the status of your earbuds. This little battery case slides into your pocket or your bag until it’s time to slide the separate earbuds into your ears. A handful of pin connectors on the earbuds themselves rest on charging contacts, keeping each of the two buds charged while the lid is closed.

You need a PC to update these headphones, something you should never see in 2016.

Once the earbuds are removed from the casing, the infrared sensor on the body waits until skin is detected, and a quiet tone confirms to the user that these earbuds are ready to use. These are small earbuds with a simple set of instructions — push and twist. The small, flexible fin squishes the earbuds into place as you twist, and no amount of shaking your head or jogging will dislodge them. The earbuds just barely escape the ear profile, making them just difficult enough to see that you look extra crazy when talking on the phone in public.

Wait a min. I need a phone app to use these headphones. But I have to use a PC MANAGER to install an update? pic.twitter.com/mkbGPL5AzW

— Andrew Martonik (@andrewmartonik) September 13, 2016

Any other Bluetooth earbuds would be ready for pairing at this point. But Samsung instructs users to install the Gear Manager app and adjust settings accordingly. This is both tedious and incredibly important. It’s tedious because Samsung will immediately prompt you to install software updates on the Gear IconX by connecting the battery case to a computer and installing a separate app, something no Bluetooth anything should ever do in 2016. Once you get over that hurdle, though, you’re able to designate a “primary” earbud and access settings for things like having notifications read to you and workout guidance when in fitness mode.

There are no buttons on these earbuds, which is perhaps the most impressive part of the execution.

Setting a primary earbud is only important if you’re ever planning to use your IconX as a Bluetooth headset, because that becomes the earbud used for calls. You can switch back and forth at will, and if you drain the battery on one you can easily switch to the other, but it’s an important setting to be aware of when using them. This primary earbud connects to the phone, while the other connects directly to the other earbud. If there’s a delay in audio created by connecting earbuds this way, I certainly couldn’t hear it. Never once in the two weeks of testing these earbuds did the audio ever fall out of sync.

There are no buttons on these earbuds, which is perhaps the most impressive part of the execution. The outer shell is a touch surface, which allows you to control audio by swiping up and down, skip tracks by swiping left and right, and pause by tapping anywhere. If you want to access settings from inside this interface, you press your finger to the pad and listen as options are read off to you. When you get to the option you want, remove your finger and the option will be activated. It works very well given how small the touch area is on these earbuds, unless of course your hair gets stuck in between you and the touch pad.

Flawless fitness

The same sensor that detects when you’ve inserted the earbuds into your ear acts as a fitness tracker that plays nice with Samsung’s S Health app. With the earbuds connected you get a constant stream of heart rate data during workouts, and the earbuds work with the app to keep you informed of your progress. When you tell S Health you’re going to go a certain distance, you get notifications when you reach the half way point, and weird robotic encouragement messages when you get close to the virtual finish line. This kind of extra data is fantastic if you’re actively using S Health, but it’s limited to only chatting with that app right now.

Basically, these earbuds are great if you’re only using them for a commute or if you’re hitting the gym before or after work.

On top of logging fitness data, you can store up to 4GB of music in the earbuds themselves and go running without bringing your phone along. You load music by connecting the battery case to a PC with the Gear Manager app or directly to your phone with an adapter cable. This is a little outdated and tedious, but the end result is an MP3 player baked in to your earbuds, which is quite useful. The same touch controls exist in this standalone playback mode, which works great even when you’re running. You lose access to the cheery robot messages and the GPS data that comes from having your phone in your pocket, but it’s a nice option if you’d prefer to avoid strapping something as big as an S7 Edge to your arm for a run.

If you’re the type to run to a specific location, maybe for a bottle of water or a snack break, the Gear IconX offers another fantastic feature to help you out. Press and hold on the earbuds to activate audio pass through mode, and the microphones on the earbuds will let you hear the world around you. This works really well, especially if you’re going to be speaking to other people. It means you don’t have to remove the earbuds, and can quickly get back to the task at hand. It’d be nice if every Bluetooth headset could offer this, but since it requires decent stereo microphones in order to do it well it’s not surprising that so many don’t.

Mediocre music for minutes

It’s a good thing these earbuds do so much more than play music, because they don’t do that particularly well. Even compared to other Samsung Bluetooth earbuds, which admittedly all include cables and batteries in conveniently stashed places that don’t exist on the Gear Icon X, the experience is lacking. There’s no bass to these earbuds at all, and the highs couldn’t get much more tinny if they were $10 at Radio Shack. It could be argued that no Bluetooth headphones produce “great” audio, but this experience is especially lacking.

If you’re looking for earbuds that will get you through an entire day of music listening, these are not what you want.

Unfortunately, the same can be said for battery life. If you manage three hours of constant audio streaming with your Gear Icon X, consider yourself fortunate. The average is around 2.5 hours on a single charge, after which you’ll need to put the earbuds back into the battery case to charge. The case itself is good for at least one full charge, but it’s going to take nearly an hour, and you can’t use the earbuds at all during this process. Once you reconnect the earbuds you’re good for another couple of hours, but if you find yourself needing a second charge there’s a good chance you’ll come back to one one earbud being mostly charged.

Basically, these earbuds are great if you’re only using them for a commute or if you’re hitting the gym before or after work. If you’re looking for earbuds that will get you through an entire day of music listening, these are just not what you want.

Should you buy this? Probably not

Samsung has crammed a ton of great ideas into a very small space. These earbuds easily outpace all of the other earbuds out there when it comes to features, especially when it comes to acting as a fitness accessory. If you’re looking for earbuds that help you when you work out, these might be for you.

If you’re looking for the traditional Bluetooth earbud for listening to music all day, this isn’t for you. There are other, cheaper options with better audio that aren’t limited to Samsung’s hardware. But a second generation IconX that addresses some of these issues is something you should absolutely keep your eye out for.

See at Amazon




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |

Where can I get a PlayStation VR on launch day?

With Sony’s multiple pre-order waves evaporating minutes after they were opened, a lot of people hoping to get their hands on PlayStation VR before 2017 are faced with a single option. It’s time to find a store to camp out in front of the night before launch in hopes of snatching up one of the few extras that will be available at select retailers. We’ve all done it, and if you’ve tried PlayStation VR in a demo station you know it’s worth it. Here’s where you need to go if you want to increase your chances of being one of the first to have this VR experience in your home.

Read more at VR Heads!




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |

Jackery is currently offering its 10050mAh Quick Charge 3.0 battery pack for just $22, a savings of $8 with coupon code THUNDERJ. That’s right, Quick Charge 3.0 on the go, right from your bag, without needing to be tethered to a wall. Now, as you walk between business meetings or wait for the bus to arrive, you can charge your phone up quickly and easily. At just over 10000mAh, you’ll be able to charge most phones up to four times, and thanks to its dual USB outputs you can charge more than one device at a time.

If you don’t want to spend hours waiting for your phone to charge, you’ll want to grab one of these before the deal runs out. Remember, you’ll need coupon code THUNDERJ for the full savings here.

See at Amazon




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |

What happened on September 29?

Do you use a smartwatch? I do, and there’s a higher-than-normal percent chance that you do, too, if you’re reading this. But do your friends and family members adorn Moto 360s, Gear S2s or Pebbles? Perhaps some wear an Apple Watch? The more likely answer is that they wear a Fitbit, if anything at all. I still know some folks who wear the same Casio calculator watch they graduated high school with 20 years ago. Man, I’m getting old.

With the news that Android Wear 2.0 is getting pushed to early 2017, it occurs to me that the smartwatch wave rose and fell more quickly than even tablets, settling into the steady pace of iteration we see today. It helped that companies already had a pretty good playbook to work from, but it also speaks to the fact that, being accessories, they don’t need to be overly complicated. But with Google bringing elements of the Play Store to Android Wear devices, it appears the company is readying itself for the swift proliferation of 3G and LTE-connected watches. Will they catch on? Will people even want to leave their phones at home?

I doubt it, but what do I know? I’m just a blogger.

Android Wear reboot has been delayed until next year

It was never realistic to expect Android Wear 2.0 to debut in 2016, given the state it was in back at Google I/O. But alongside the penultimate developer preview, which introduced a number of great new features to the next version of Google’s wearables platform, the company announced it was pushing back its public release until “early 2017.” Still worth the wait. More

Google Maps gets safer with new hands-free voice support

Using your phone in the car is a bad thing. We can all agree on that, right? But it’s inevitable sometimes, especially when navigating. Now, Google Maps has added “OK Google” support for those times you just need to know where the closest sushi joint is while on your way to visit grandma. More

Huawei Mate 9 launch event set for Nov. 3 in Munich

Expect a big screen, crazy specs (up to 6GB of RAM, 256GB of storage) from the new Huawei flagship, which should run a new, cleaner EMUI interface based on Android 7.0 Nougat. More

LeEco is jumping headfirst into to the U.S. next month

LeEco, the huge Chinese company that sells everything from TVs to smartphones to self-driving cars is throwing itself a housewarming party of sorts to celebrate its entry into the U.S. The company is holding an event on October 19 in San Francisco to show off its “ecosystem model that integrates platform, content, devices and applications for a truly connected experience.” OK, then. More

Google Apps for Work is now G Suite

Google has rebranded their business offerings with a new name — G Suite. Formerly known as Google Apps for Your Domain and then just Google Apps, the new handle still encompasses the same core applications many businesses use every day: Gmail, Docs, Drive, Calendar, Hangouts, and more. Google says the new name will help promote their original goal to help people work and innovate together.

LG V20 pre-orders begin October 17 in the U.S.

Mark Monday, October 17 on your calendar as the day the LG V20 goes up for pre-order in the States. While earlier reports indicated the phone would be available sooner, it seems more likely that the original shipping date of October 21 is accurate. Oh, well.

Samsung expects Korean Note 7 return rate to hit 80% by Oct. 1 restart date

According to Reuters, the company has restarted TV commercials for the beleaguered phone, and is offering 50% off repairs for Korean customers buying in the month of October. More

Sony Xperia XZ Dual coming to India Oct. 1

The dual-SIM version of a phone we’re already familiar with will be available in India in blue, black and grey. Sony promises a free Smartband Talk SWR30 for pre-order customers, as well as free paid app content.

Samsung says 1 million users around the world have Note 7 with safe battery

The news comes as Samsung looks to wrap up its global recall and recommence sales of the phone around the world. Reuters reports that the company also apologized to Chinese consumers for not adequately explaining that Note 7s sold in China were safe, as they used a battery from another supplier.

OnePlus 3 in Soft Gold coming to India Oct. 1

The phone will be sold exclusively on Amazon India for ?27,999 ($420). More

Lyrics are coming to Spotify on Android

Starting with a rollout in Japan, lyrics support is coming to Spotify users on Android, after rolling out to desktop listeners earlier this year.

Rogers really, really wants you to buy a Moto Z from them

Rogers is giving away a Moto Insta-Share Projector with each pre-order of the Moto Z until October 4. Valued at $399 the pico projector is one of the more intriguing Moto Mods available for the Moto Z line — though the JBL SoundBoost speaker may have been more useful, just saying. More

Many Android Wear watches don’t work with the iPhone 7

It took nearly two weeks for anyone to notice.




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |

‘New flagship device’ to break cover at press conference in Munich.

Huawei’s holding a launch event in Munich, Germany on November 3 for a “new flagship device”, and that almost certainly means the Mate 9 is on its way. The latest in Huawei’s series of big-screened phones is likely to pack the very best of the company’s high-end hardware, along with the anticipated EMUI 5 interface, based on [Android 7.0 Nougat[(/./nougat).

Recent leaks out of China point to the Mate 9 being a beast of a phone.

Recent leaks out of China have given us a sneak peek at the phone, which comes in three price tiers and six colors, with up to 6GB of RAM and 32GB of storage. It’s also believed to the first phone to run Huawei’s homegrown Kirin 960 chip, the first to utilize ARM’s speedy new Cortex-A73 cores. In short: Expect a beast of a phone.

The software side of things is equally important. Huawei has drawn criticism over its EMUI interface for years. And based on a leaked version of EMUI 5 that appeared on the P9 over the summer, the new version promises to banish many of the bugbears of earlier versions, like lock screen weirdness, notification area glitches and overbearing visual customizations. The dream of a Huawei phone without weird software could finally be coming true.

A November launch event means the Mate 9 should be on sale in Europe in time for the holidays — an earlier launch window than last year. What’s more, the ongoing difficulties faced by Samsung’s Note 7 could present Huawei’s new “phablet”-class device with a shot at mainstream success.




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |

The industry has sort of agreed that phones with 5.5-inch screens are mainstream. The best phone you can buy at that size is the Samsung Galaxy S7 edge.

Best overall

Samsung Galaxy S7 edge

See at AT&T
See at Sprint
See at T-Mobile
See at Verizon
See at Amazon

There’s no question that Samsung hit a home run with its Galaxy S7 line. We already think the smaller GS7 is the best phone under 5.2 inches, and the larger, curved-screen Galaxy S7 edge is our pick for the best phone under 5.7 inches. Why? It takes everything we love about the smaller phone and makes it bigger — but not too much.

This water-resistant phone is comfortable to hold, and even to use in one hand, while the internal specs are some of the best in the business — Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 in the U.S. and an Exynos 8890 internationally — with 4GB of RAM and a standard 32GB of storage. But it’s the dual curved display that is so arresting, with an infinity pool experience that really stands out amongst a sea of flat smartphones. That curvature also has a purpose, allowing for quick access to favorite contacts, apps, web pages, and more.

Around back, the 12MP rear camera is the best in the business; many other devices have been released since the Galaxy S7 edge came out earlier this year, and none — not even Apple’s iPhone 7 Plus — has dislodged it from that top position. And just underneath that camera, a massive 3,600mAh battery keeps things moving all day.

Bottom line: The Galaxy S7 edge is one of the obvious choices for the best smartphones around, but it is definitely the best smartphone between between 5.2 inches and 5.6 inches.

One More thing: This highly-rated device is available at all four major carriers in the U.S., but if you’d rather live dangerously and contract-free, Samsung offers an unlocked model that also works overseas.

Why the Galaxy S7 edge is the best

A beautiful phone that delivers the specs and performance.

In previous years, Samsung managed to out-promote its way to sales victory, even as phones from HTC, Motorola and LG were objectively better. But starting in 2015 that all changed when the company unveiled its Galaxy S6 and S6 edge, two of the most interesting, beautiful, and well-designed phones on the market. That playbook was even more refined this year with the Galaxy S7 edge, which took cues from its curved predecessor while upping the screen size — and the usability.

The phone has a number of things going for it, including water resistance, expandable storage, plenty of speed and power, an enormous battery that lasts all day, and a stunning 5.5-inch QHD AMOLED display that curves at both sides in an effortless infinity pool effect. But the whole experience comes together when you realize Samsung took to heart much of the criticism levelled against its software in recent years, improving the way you navigate through the interface, while removing impediments to quick actions and shortcuts. Moreover, there are some truly innovative ideas in the software, from the edge screen to the excellent camera app, which was redesigned for this generation.

While the Galaxy S7 will likely appeal to more people, the GS7 edge’s larger chassis and curved display give it something a little bit extra — including a higher price tag. We say that added cost is worth it if you’re looking for a phone that lasts all day and then some, or use your phone for a lot of media consumption.

Best at many things

OnePlus 3

See at OnePlus

The OnePlus 3 does everything well — that’s what you need to know first. It’s a huge upgrade over the OnePlus 2, and its all-metal chassis doesn’t feel overly large despite the ample 5.5-inch screen size. And that’s what you’re looking for in a big phone: one that doesn’t feel like a brick in your hand.

OnePlus did a great job improving the internals in the OnePlus 3: the 5.5-inch Full HD display is vivid and bright, and the quad-core Snapdragon 820 paired with 6GB of RAM makes the phone a formidable performer — even more so when you consider the $399 price point. While it lacks the little things that add up to justify the S7 edge’s extra cost — water resistance, expandable storage, and a high-quality QHD display — the OnePlus 3 is without compromises, which is something we’re really happy to see at this price tier.

Bottom-line: With a big, bright 5.5-inch screen, a great camera, excellent build quality, and loads of nice software touches, the OnePlus 3 is one of the best smartphone deals you can find today.

One more thing: The OnePlus 3 has a 16MP camera that does a lot more than just shoot great photos — it supports 4K video, slo-mo, and excellent panoramas.

Best for doing more

Moto Z

See at Motorola

The Moto Z is an interesting phone. Yes, it doesn’t have a headphone jack, but there is so much more to the story than that. It’s extremely thin — under 5.2mm to be exact — and light, but is made of strong stuff, including aluminum and stainless steel. And while the Moto Mods story is the one that most people are telling, even without add-ons the Moto Z is one of the best Android experiences on the market. It has a great 5.5-inch QHD display, the specs you’d expect from a $699 phone, including an excellent 13MP rear camera and some fantastic software, but when paired with a Moto Mod, the story becomes more interesting.

Those Mods, which range from inexpensive battery adds-ons to more expensive projector and camera options, add a considerable amount of functionality to the device, and are well worth the investment.

Bottom-line: It may not be cheap, but Motorola, under Lenovo’s ownership, has proven that it is still one of the most innovative companies in phones today.

One more thing: You can buy the Moto Z unlocked directly from Motorola, as well as through Verizon under the Droid name.

Conclusion

There are so many smartphones out there today. It’s not easy picking the right one, especially when tasked with choosing a phone at a certain size. This bracket, between 5.3 and 5.6 inches, appears to be the sweet spot for many people, which is why an increasing number of flagships are settling in it.

The Galaxy S7 edge has no real flaws: it is fast, intuitive, and well-designed, with premium materials and lots of space for a great camera and capacious battery. It may be expensive, but Samsung has proven with this year’s phone lineup that the extra cost over, say, the OnePlus 3, is justified.

Best overall

Samsung Galaxy S7 edge

See at AT&T
See at Sprint
See at T-Mobile
See at Verizon
See at Amazon

There’s no question that Samsung hit a home run with its Galaxy S7 line. We already think the smaller GS7 is the best phone under 5.2 inches, and the larger, curved-screen Galaxy S7 edge is our pick for the best phone under 5.7 inches. Why? It takes everything we love about the smaller phone and makes it bigger — but not too much.

This water-resistant phone is comfortable to hold, and even to use in one hand, while the internal specs are some of the best in the business — Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 in the U.S. and an Exynos 8890 internationally — with 4GB of RAM and a standard 32GB of storage. But it’s the dual curved display that is so arresting, with an infinity pool experience that really stands out amongst a sea of flat smartphones. That curvature also has a purpose, allowing for quick access to favorite contacts, apps, web pages, and more.

Around back, the 12MP rear camera is the best in the business; many other devices have been released since the Galaxy S7 edge came out earlier this year, and none — not even Apple’s iPhone 7 Plus — has dislodged it from that top position. And just underneath that camera, a massive 3,600mAh battery keeps things moving all day.

Bottom line: The Galaxy S7 edge is one of the obvious choices for the best smartphones around, but it is definitely the best smartphone between between 5.2 inches and 5.6 inches.

One More thing: This highly-rated device is available at all four major carriers in the U.S., but if you’d rather live dangerously and contract-free, Samsung offers an unlocked model that also works overseas.


Note: This list is of phones between 5.3 inches and 5.6 inches. We already have a list of the best phones 5.2 inches and under, and the best phones 5.7 inches and above.




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |

Over the hills and far away.

This morning, as BlackBerry announced the shuttering of its hardware division, which will lead to around 100 job losses at the company, LG began to ramp up the V20 sales machine in its home country of Korea.

Frankly, it’s no surprise that BlackBerry has taken this road given its difficulty selling hardware since the introduction of BlackBerry 10 in 2013. And while the Priv, its first Android phone, was pretty well-received, it’s safe to say it didn’t break sales records. But while it was marketing the Priv and working with TCL on releasing its follow-up, the $299 DTEK50, it was quietly improving its Android software suite with the intention of releasing it widely across the Android ecosystem. The reality is that BlackBerry has always been pretty good at software, and despite its struggles to build a viable app store within BlackBerry 10, its iOS and Android alternative, it was a pretty good OS.

At the same time, after using the V20 in a pre-production state, it’s clear that LG, like many other Android OEMs, still struggles to temper its tendency to overthink Android software. It may launch with Android 7.0 Nougat, but it doesn’t really resemble what you’d find on the Nexus 6P or 5X.

Companies like LG, Huawei, and even Samsung, could learn a thing or two from BlackBerry by focusing on providing an Android experience as well-considered and mature as their hardware.

And if you’re still interested in BlackBerry as a company, and BB10 as an OS, CrackBerry isn’t going anywhere. Go pay them a visit, and tell them Daniel sent you.

Huawei Mate 9 leaks: six colors, up to 6GB RAM and 256GB storage

Looks like Huawei’s upcoming Nougat-powered slab will have three price tiers between $480 and $700, with the top-level Mate 9 being available in six colors, with 6GB of RAM and an enormous quarter-terabyte of internal storage. Look for a mid-November launch with the new EMUI 5 interface. More

BlackBerry is out of the phone business

While not entirely surprising, BlackBerry has confirmed that its future is entirely in the software space. After years of waffling around it, CEO John Chen said during its Q2 2017 earnings that the company would stop designing and building its own phones, choosing to rely on third parties like Foxconn and TCL. More

OnePlus continues move towards creating water

The OnePlus 3 is getting another community build. OxygenOS 3.5.3 adds a few tweaks, including scrolling screenshots and a new default clock widget for the home screen. It’s unclear when OxygenOS 3.5 will move to production, but it shouldn’t be too long now before the merger of OxygenOS and HydrogenOS is complete.

In other OnePlus news, the end-of-the-line OnePlus X is finally getting its Marshmallow update with OxygenOS 3.1.2.

MasterCard offering Brits free London travel and coffee with Android Pay

Each Monday in October, the card provider will cover the cost of travel on TfL, including the tube, London bus services and Emirates Air Line (up to £30.50), as well as offering free hot drinks at Caffe Nero when you use Android Pay. Check out the full details.

Samsung faces new Note 7 battery fire claim in China

A Guangzhou man claims his Note 7 exploded less than day after delivery, but he’s reportedly not handing it over for inspection by Samsung because he doesn’t trust the company. Two similar reports have been explained away by Samsung as being caused by external heat sources. More

LG V20 lands in Korea this week

Other regions (with the exception of Europe) should be getting the phone in the coming weeks. More

Google Play Music now available in India

At long last, it appears Google’s entire music catalog is available to Indian consumers. Singles cost ?15, with albums between ?70 and ?210 (more than Apple Music). Play Music also has most Bollywood albums released in the last 20 years. More

Alcatel brings the Idol 4 to Canada for free on contract

Alcatel told Canadians that the Idol 4 would be coming to Quebec-only Videotron on September 30, and now the company is also bringing the phone, minus the cool VR headset, to Bell and Virgin Mobile. Available for $0 on a 2-year plan, or $299.99 outright, the Idol 4 doesn’t have the greatest spec sheet, but it is a pretty decent little phone for the price. There’s also a new Pop 7 LTE tablet available at both carriers for $150.

Anyone can now create a Twitter Moment

Do you use Twitter Moments? You know that middle tab that gets in the way of your horizontal scrolling between Timeline and Direct Message. I kid, but not really. Now, Twitter is rolling out Moments creation to anyone, allowing users to compile Tweets into a cohesive narrative in order to tell a story. Yay?

That’s a mighty big smartphone

Huh.




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |

Virtual reality roller coasters are certainly cool, but are they really the future of theme parks?

Whose bright idea was it to strap a vomit-inducing virtual reality headset to people’s faces and then flip them upside down at 55 miles per hour?

It’s certainly not my idea of fun, but in the spirit of Halloween and all the thrills that come with it, Samsung and Six Flags debuted Rage of the Gargoyles, one of the first virtual reality coasters with a video game built into the ride. You play it by pointing your head at moving targets with the Gear VR while flying through the air on one of eight participating Six Flags coasters around the U.S. The game is meant to seamlessly integrate with all the twists and turns of the coaster its synced to, and Six Flags even promises that you won’t feel any motion sickness. Well, I’m here to tell you that this is not entirely true, as I learned from my own experience playing Rage of the Gargoyles.

Read more at VR Heads




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |