O2

Network launching in just three markets, prices and data allowances not specified.

Following in the footsteps of EE which already has LTE available in the U.K., carrier O2 has announced that it will launch its higher speed network as well at the end of August. O2 says that the network will go live on August 29th in London, Leeds and Bradford with a total of 10 cities going live with the network by year's end.

That still puts O2 in a tough position, as EE already operates its network in some 95 markets. Additionally, O2 hasn't given detailed information about the monthly prices or data allowances on LTE plans aside from a quoted "basic" 4G tariff of £26 per month. It's clear that O2 has a long ways to go before it will be drawing anyone to its LTE network.

Source: BBC

    




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Our smartphones and tablets are increasingly becoming repositories of our personal information. It’s a treasure trove of data that could be used to build a frighteningly complete picture of you as a person. It’s more than just your contacts, calendar, memos, and photos – it’s your web history, your calls and text messages, your banking data and social network logins.

People say “my whole life is on my phone”, and while that hopefully isn’t entirely true (time to reevaluate your priorities if it is), an increasingly large portion of our lives – or at least the data that comprises it – is finding residence on these devices. So just how are we going about keeping it all secure?

How do we deal with the threat of the less-than-thoughtful people around us, let alone the government’s intrusions? How do we keep our devices and the accounts on them secured? And how do we train our children, the ones that are growing up in a world where ubiquitous internet is a fact of life, to understand the real threats that exist on the internet and how to protect themselves?

Let’s get the conversation started!

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Seidio SURFACE for Nexus 4

Protect your Nexus 4's fragile exterior and pick up some style points at the same time.

 

The Nexus 4's design has a lot of great features, but one of them isn't durability. With big plates of glass on both sides of the device and easily scuffed plastic around the sides, we wouldn't blame you one bit for wanting a case wrapped around it. Or like many of us, you may have gone without a case on your Nexus 4 at first, and now about 6 months in it has picked up some wear and is in need of a little facelift. 

Seidio makes many great cases, and it now offers what is called the SURFACE kickstand case for the Nexus 4, and it's designed to take a beating and add a little bit of functionality and style while it does it. Read along after the break for a closer look.

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Shield case.

Keep your NVIDIA Shield safe and give it a new look with these official accessories

To go along with our review of Shield, we're also taking a look at a couple of accessories being released by NVIDIA. Today we're looking at the official custom carrying case as well as the custom lid. The hard case is exactly what you think it would be, along with a nice surprise around back. It's custom molded to fit Shield perfectly, with moldings on the inside for the triggers as well as a small mesh pouch for smaller accessory on the top half. The inside is lined with a soft felt, and we've yet to notice it leaving any marks on Shield. You'll see some nicely done Shield branding on the front, with "NVIDIA green" piping accenting the bottom half of the case. It also has a wrist strap, which is removable if it's not really your thing. I haven't dropped it, but it's built well enough to take a decent impact. I wouldn't go throwing it across the room, though.

The custom lid is something that allows you to personalize Shield more to your liking. Initially they will be available in glossy black and carbon fiber. I don't have the carbon fiber here, but the glossy black is very well done. I've used it almost exclusively, and it's held up well, with no nicks or scratches to be seen anywhere. Whatever NVIDIA used on this particular lid needs to be shared with other manufacturers — it's that durable. They are held on magnetically, and try as I might, I can't make it not line up the way it's supposed to. Initially NVIDIA used a type of clip to hold them on, but switched to magnets based on feedback from industry experts. It works really well, and kudos to them for listening to the feedback and making appropriate changes.

You can pick up the custom carrying case for $39.99 and the lids for $19.99 each from your local Shield retailer. We have a hands-on video and a few pictures after the break.  

Have questions about Shield?  We'll have all the answers you want in our Ask Me Anything thread.

NVIDIA Shield review | NVIDIA Shield forums

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NVIDIA Shield review

31 July 2013

NVIDIA Shield.

NVIDIA has long been a major player in the PC gaming industry, and that translates nicely to mobile with Shield

The NVIDIA Shield is not the first Android handheld designed for gaming. We’ve seen Archos try its hand at a small-form tablet with gaming controls, MOGA and others have created accessories that will transform your smartphone into a gaming unit, and using USB host with a game controller can make plenty of phones or tablets into a great on-the-go gaming rig. We'll try to forget about the Xperia Play. Sony sure did.

But NVIDIA has done something different. The Shield isn’t an Android device that also plays games pretty well, it’s a gaming machine first and foremost. Every design decision, every hardware part, every component was chosen and used to try and offer the best gaming experience you can get from an Android-powered device. You'll be able to pick up your own NVIDIA Shield starting today (July 31). Preorders are shipping, and units are available for $299 at NVIDIA.com or Newegg.com, or at a SHIELD Experience Center in select GameStop, Microcenter, Canada Computer locations in the U.S. and Canada. Now the real question is — did NVIDIA succeed at making the Android game system everyone has been waiting for?

Editor’s note: This review was co-authored by both Jerry Hildenbrand and Kevin O’Quinn, Android Central’s resident NVIDIA “champ." Kevin is a known hardware junkie, and provided input about the hardware and specifications from his perspective.

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Nobody’s entirely sure how it started, but it’s a trend that’s taken the corporate IT world by storm over the past few years. In all likelihood it began with a CEO walking into the CIO’s office with his new shiny new iPhone and saying “Steve, put my email on this.”

“But, Sir, we issued you a BlackBerry,” Steve, the CIO, pointed at the stack of BlackBerry Bolds on his desk. “We all have BlackBerrys.”

The CEO glared at him and growled, “Steve, I want my email on this. Make it work.” He set the iPhone on Steve’s desk and left the dark IT office.

Steve looked at the black glass slab on the corner of his desk and swallowed. “I don’t like where this is going.”

A multi-platform mobile ecosystem has become the new reality for corporate IT. They have to manage multiple operating systems and even devices owned by employees. Mobile devices are becoming more and more prevalent in business – but can they replace the desktop? Is the Bring-Your-Own-Device trend a good thing? And just what does IT need to make all of this happen?

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Nexus 7

The new Nexus 7 has big shoes to fill, but Google has made all the right choices

When Google launched the original Nexus 7 in June of last year, it in effect took the fate of Android tablets into its own hands. Sure, there were plenty of Android-powered slates before the Nexus 7 (Google even partnered with Motorola for one) and there have been many since, but the original Nexus 7 saw unprecedented adoption. And rightly so — we'd say that the Nexus 7 was the first "great" Android tablet — one that could actually be mentioned as a competitor to the sales monstrosity that is the iPad. 

We wouldn't say that the success of the original Nexus 7 (which may or may not have been expected) put pressure on Google so much as it encouraged it to one-up the original. For once in the history of Nexus devices, Google had its hands on a product that sold like gangbusters, and not just to nerds but to normal people that just wanted a great tablet experience at an affordable price. Hitting that magical $199 price point, it sold millions of units per month up until the day it was replaced by this, the new Nexus 7.

With their second attempt at a 7-inch Nexus tablet, Google and manufacturer ASUS are looking to appeal to that same audience, with sweeping internal upgrades that will also appeal to spec junkies. It's sleek, well made, trimmed down in all of the right places and bulked up in others that are just as important — everything you want to see in a second-generation product.

ASUS and Google have teamed up again and created something wonderful. Read on for our full review of the 2013 Google Nexus 7.

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Earlier this month, we learned that HTC had managed to pull in $41.63 million in profits during the second quarter. The number want’s that shocking since HTC had nearly suffered a loss during Q1, but HTC’s new guidance for Q3 shows that the company isn’t out of the woods yet. Due …


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Nexus 7s

Owners of original Nexus 7's with sluggish performance should see a speed boost after the update

It seems that the curious case of the sluggish Nexus 7 has been solved with the inclusion of TRIM support in Android 4.3. TRIM is essentially a way for the device's software to communicate with the on-board storage to let it know when blocks are sitting unused and ready for garbage collection. This is a necessary process, because when a user "deletes" files on a device, the file isn't actually removed from storage but simply marked as being available space to be cleared later when it is needed by the system. Unless TRIM is working to actually clear up those unused blocks, they will still be considered full by the storage itself.

For previous versions of Android TRIM wasn't enabled, which led to slower and slower I/O performance over time — something that hit the Nexus 7 particularly hard. Luckily thanks to some investigation and testing by AnandTech, it is confirmed that the Android 4.3 update is bringing TRIM support to not only the Nexus 7 but every Nexus device.

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LG G2 QuickWindow Case

Never mind that we've got a little more than a week to go before the LG G2 is unveiled in New York City — the Korea manufacturer is letting loose let another teaser.

What you see here is what appears to be a flip case with a transparent window — yes, just like what Samsung's got on a couple of its models — that'll add a bit of functionality to the G2. In fact, it's got a good half-dozen features packed in there. Through the window you'll be able to see a clock, the current weather, an alarm clock, music player, incoming call details and text messages.

And, as you see, it'll be available seven colors.

LG is set to launch the G2 on Aug. 7 — if it can wait that long.

    




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