Gears & Guts hacks and slashes its way into Google Play

Free

Gears & Guts cruised into Android today, bristling with all manner of unlikely weaponry. This free top-down action game puts players up against a horde of zombies that they have to clear out with car-mounted chainsaws, flamethrowers, and machine guns. Here's what you can expect. 

  • Wide-open combat in massive environments.
  • Sports cars, monster trucks and armored vehicles.
  • Dozens of cars and items to earn, including rare, experimental weapons.
  • One car vs. hundreds of zombies, like…
  • The Walker: Cannon-fodder, but deadly in groups.
  • The Bruiser: A walking mountain of undead flesh.
  • The Runner: Keep your speed up or they’ll drag you down.

Glu recently churned out Mutant Roadkill with an obscene reliance on in-app purchases and ads, and was also oddly about running over mindless shamblers. I've played around with Gears & Guts for a little bit, IAPs and ads aren't quite as obnoxious, though they're still a big part of the picture. If you're into gore, give Gears & Guts a shot. 




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |

From the Forums

Just in case you missed out on some of the Android news today, now is the time to go ahead and get yourself fully caught up. Here on the blogs and in the Android Central Forums there is plenty to talk about. Have some questions? Need some help or just looking to chat Android? You know where to go, check out some of the threads below to get started.

We've got nearly 1 million members helping members and nearly 2 million posts in our Android Forums. Are you one of them? Join today!




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |

It’s nice when one HTC handset gets updated to Android 4.0, but it’s extremely rare that we see a second phone get the update – on the same day. After pushing out the Ice Cream Sandwich update to the HTC EVO 3D, Sprint decided that it was also ready to deliver the dessert treat to [...]





Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: HTC |

Word on the street is that Sprint has started pushing out the Android 4.0 update for the HTC EVO 3D. HTC promised to deliver the update before the end of July, which they did (just barely). The Ice Cream Sandwich update for the EVO 3D delivers all the new features Google unveiled with the new [...]





Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: HTC |

Samsung Music Hub  

Samsung today announced that its new Music Hub service, previously only available in the UK, is now available in the United States. But only on the Galaxy S III, and only on two carriers. That'll change, as the service expands, but for now, it's not all that widespread.

We've been using Music Hub for a couple weeks now. In a nutshell, it's an expanded and improved — though more complicated — version of Google Music, combining locally stored songs, songs uploaded to Samsung's MSpot cloud storage and streamed back to the phone, and the 7digital online music catalog.

For now, it's only available on AT&T and US Cellular's Galaxy S3. Music Hub will be announced later for Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon.

There are a couple versions of Music Hub available. First is the free Music Hub Store, which gives you access to 7digital's library for purchase, along with 30-second previews of songs. Any music you purchase is automatically uploaded to the Music Hub cloud, as well as remaining on your phone locally for offline playback.

Then there's Music Hub Premium. It costs $9.99 a month, but you get a free 30-day trial. With the premium version, you can upload up to 100 gigabytes of music to your Music Hub account. Music Hub scans your directories for any music already in its system. If it finds a match, it'll simply stream the songs, saving upload time and space. Along with  that, you get personalized and customized Internet radio, and music recommendations.

Other features include a EQ, a number of storage and streaming settings, and the ability to change the quality of the audio to better suit your data speeds.

In our testing, Music Hub worked pretty well. Samsung's streaming and uploading services (you install an app on your Mac or PC just like you do Google Music) work as advertised. 

The 100GB of cloud storage is five times greater than what Google currently offers, though Google's giving you that 20GB for free. The question at this point is whether you're ready to invest in yet another music service, both in the time it takes to set up, and with the $120 a year it'll cost. At the very least, though, the 30-day trial is worth a look.

We've got loads more info and screen shots after the break, so let's hit it.

read more




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |

Android Central

Android Central




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |

HTC has announced that it is closing its sales office in South Korea and that it is pulling out of the country entirely, most likely due to slow sales. HTC’s move isn’t that surprising since they recently closed up shop in Brazil. The South Korean market has always been a tough place to compete, even [...]





Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: HTC |

Mutant Roadkill review - when Temple Run goes post-apocalyptic

Mutant Roadkill screeched into Google Play earlier this month as an unabashed homage to Temple Run with a few significant twists. Instead of being chased, you're the one chasing, and you're running over radioactive zombies in a gritty post-apocalyptic world.

Players mount up in a car and steer by tilting the device to the left or right in order to dodge debris littering the streets and nail shambling mutants. Some will be a bit more aggressive, and require players to scrape them off the side of their car by skimming walls, or rely on the odd power-up to clear the way. Players earn cash based on how long they survive without crashing, how many mutants they hit (earning bonus points for consecutive kills), and how many challenges they manage to complete. That coin can be used to buy new vehicles, improve power-ups, and purchase consumables. A premium currency can be bought through IAPs in order to access the particularly good stuff.

 

read more




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |

T-Mobile Galaxy Note

T-Mobile hasn't yet released their Galaxy Note, and they already have an OTA update in the works. The 5.3-inch pocket computer is set to be released on August 8, and T-Mo support says to expect an update to version T879UVLG3. The specifics are a bit thin, and the change log for the 21MB update lists three issues I'm not seeing with my review unit:

  • Error: ‘Enter MAC address’ after entering MAC address
  • Weather widget does not show current location
  • MobileLife contacts addresses combined into a single field

It's also worth mentioning that the support docs list both the current build and the upcoming OTA as Android version 4.0.3, when the current production units are running Android 4.0.4 with build number T879UVLF5. We're chalking this one up as a typo, but I've reached out to T-Mobile to verify.

To get the update, either via OTA or Samsung Kies, you'll need to have a minimum of 50-percent battery, so be ready to plug your Note in as soon as you get it out of the box a week from Wednesday.

Source: T-Mobile

 




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |

T-Mobile Galaxy Note

The timing for the Samsung Galaxy Note on T-Mobile may seem a little odd, but that doesn't necessarily detract from the oversized Android smartphone.

Reviewing a phone like the Samsung Galaxy Note for the third time is a difficult task. All the good points have been pointed out, and the not-so-good points have been argued to death, and no matter what you think, you know something bigger, stronger, and faster is coming shortly. OK, maybe not bigger in this case, but the fact remains that no matter what we think of it, the next new shiny is right around the corner. Welcome to the world of Android, and an AC editor's nightmare.

The Galaxy Note is a little easier though. It's simply not the average Android smartphone. The size (what a big, gorgeous display), seems to polarize users, with some thinking it's ridiculous, and others ready to throw money until one is in their hands. This not only gives bloggers something to talk about, but a unique experience that's refreshing to review — even almost a year after it was first introduced. 

What do I, an admitted fan of smaller phones, think of the T-Mobile Galaxy Note? Read on.

read more




Go to Source

 | Posted by | Categories: Android |